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This week’s weather forecast:

  • Tuesday – Sunny with winds 5-10 knots
  • Wednesday – Sunny with winds 5-10 knots
  • Thursday – Sunny with winds 5-10 knots
  • Friday – Sunny with winds 5-10 knots – OH, AND THERE MIGHT BE A HURRICANE TODAY!
  • Saturday – Sunny with winds 5-10 knots

WTF?

Tied safely (for the time being) at Kirk and Donna’s house we are, like everyone else in the area, paying close attention to the weather. We do have some time to kill though and thus, with a borrowed car, we’ll be exploring Annapolis. We received an advanced tour last evening when Kirk and Donna drove us into the city. We visited their yacht club, Eastport Yacht Club, for drinks and dinner and were able to see the end of the Wednesday evening races. That racing looks pretty serious!

By the way, in case you are curious why other “slightly crazy” people might want to head out cruising, check out the interview featuring our host on Beth and Evan’s Blog. I like his answer! 🙂


Watching the races from the yacht club’s terrace.

Just in case yesterday’s pics weren’t contrast enough.

11 Comments

  1. …Earl strengthens a little more…new warnings and watches
    issued…

    summary of 500 am EDT…0900 UTC…information
    ———————————————-
    location…29.3n 74.7w
    about 410 mi…660 km S of Cape Hatteras North Carolina
    about 870 mi…1400 km SSW of Nantucket Massachusetts
    maximum sustained winds…145 mph…230 km/hr
    present movement…NNW or 330 degrees at 18 mph…30 km/hr
    minimum central pressure…928 mb…27.40 inches

    watches and warnings
    ——————–
    changes with this advisory…

    a Hurricane Watch has been issued north of Sagamore Beach
    Massachusetts to Plymouth Massachusetts…and west of Woods Hole
    Massachusetts to Westport Massachusetts.

    A Tropical Storm Warning has been issued for the coast of Long
    Island New York from Fire Island Inlet northward and eastward to
    Port Jefferson Harbor.

    A tropical storm watch has been issued north of Plymouth
    Massachusetts to Eastport Maine.

    Environment Canada has issued a tropical storm watch for the coast
    of Nova Scotia from port Maitland to Medway Harbour.

    Summary of watches and warnings in effect…

    a Hurricane Warning is in effect for…
    * Bogue Inlet North Carolina northeastward to the North
    Carolina/Virginia border including the Pamlico and Albemarle
    sounds.

    A Hurricane Watch is in effect for…
    * north of the North Carolina/Virginia border to Cape Henlopen
    Delaware.
    * Westport to Plymouth Massachusetts…including Marthas
    Vineyard and Nantucket.

    A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for…
    * Cape Fear to west of Bogue Inlet North Carolina.
    * North of the North Carolina/Virginia border to Sandy Hook New
    Jersey…including Delaware Bay south of Slaughter Beach and the
    Chesapeake Bay south of New Point Comfort.
    * The coast of Long Island New York from Fire Island Inlet northward
    and eastward to Port Jefferson Harbor.

    A tropical storm watch is in effect for…
    * Sandy Hook New Jersey to Woods Hole Massachusetts…including
    Block Island and Long Island Sound.
    * The coast of Long Island New York west of Fire Island Inlet and
    Port Jefferson Harbor.
    * North of Plymouth Massachusetts to Eastport Maine.
    * The coast of Nova Scotia from port Maitland to Medway Harbour.

    A Hurricane Warning means that hurricane conditions are expected
    somewhere within the warning area.

    A Hurricane Watch means that hurricane conditions are possible
    within the watch area.

    A Tropical Storm Warning means that tropical storm conditions are
    expected somewhere within the warning area within 36 hours.

    A tropical storm watch means that tropical storm conditions are
    possible within the watch area…generally within 48 hours.

    Interests elsewhere in northern New England and southeastern Canada
    should monitor the progress of Earl.

    For storm information specific to your area in the United
    States…including possible inland watches and warnings…please
    monitor products issued by your local National Weather Service
    forecast office. For storm information specific to your area outside
    the United States…please monitor products issued by your National
    meteorological service.

    Discussion and 48-hour outlook
    ——————————
    at 500 am EDT…0900 UTC…the center of Hurricane Earl was located
    near latitude 29.3 north…longitude 74.7 West. Earl is moving
    toward the north-northwest near 18 mph…30 km/hr. A turn toward
    the north is expected later today…with a turn toward the
    north-northeast and a faster forward speed expected on Friday. On
    the forecast track…the center of Earl will pass near the North
    Carolina Outer Banks tonight…and approach southeastern New
    England Friday night.

    Reports from an Air Force Reserve hurricane hunter aircraft indicate
    that maximum sustained winds are now near 145 mph…230 km/hr…
    with higher gusts. Earl is a category four hurricane on the
    Saffir-Simpson hurricane wind scale. A gradual weakening is
    expected to start later today.

    Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 90 miles…150 km…from
    the center…and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 230
    miles…370 km.

    The minimum central pressure estimated from the hurricane hunter
    data is 928 mb…27.40 inches.

    Hazards affecting land
    ———————-
    winds…tropical-storm-force winds are expected to reach the North
    Carolina coast within the warning area by this afternoon with
    hurricane force winds occurring by Thursday night. Tropical-storm-
    force winds will likely reach the coast from Virginia northward to
    New Jersey by late Thursday night or early Friday.

    Storm surge…a dangerous storm surge will raise water levels by as
    much as 3 to 5 feet above ground level within the Hurricane Warning
    area and the lower Chesapeake Bay. Elsewhere within the Tropical
    Storm Warning area…storm surge will raise water levels by as much
    as 1 to 3 feet above ground level. Near the coast…the surge will
    be accompanied by large and destructive waves.

    Rainfall…accumulations of 2 to 4 inches…with isolated
    maximum amounts of 6 inches…are expected over portions of eastern
    North Carolina including the Outer Banks. Accumulations of 1 to 2
    inches are possible farther to the north along the immediate
    mid-Atlantic coast.

    Surf…large swells from Earl will continue to affect the Bahamas
    and the East Coast of the United States through Friday. These
    swells will likely cause dangerous surf conditions and rip
    currents.

    Next advisory
    ————-
    next intermediate advisory…800 am EDT.
    Next complete advisory…1100 am EDT.

    $$
    Forecaster Beven

  2. Mike and Rebbecca,

    Hold on tight, this could get ugly.

    Sorry you weren’t able to stop in Manasquan but it’s a good coast to do in one day if practical.

    Say hi to David for me. We miss him.

    Best,

    Russ

    • Thanks Russ. Yes, we were unhappy to breeze by you but we also thought we should get the passage done as quickly as the weather would allow. I think I’ll give David a shout today.

  3. Hey if it makes you feel any better (probably not but hope springs eternal) if you were still in your home waters (or anywhere on the Great Lakes for that matter) you would be battening down the hatches as well. Lake Ontario to 35 knots and 10 footers on Saturday and Sunday. Lake Huron (our home waters) 35-45 knots and 10-14 footers. Not exactly hurricane force, but not pretty. Be safe. I bet others have told you but you guys do a fantastic job with your blog. I have read a few dozen and follow 3 or 4. Yours is the best, taking us all right along with you. Eventually you need to turn the entire story into a book, if you have not thought about that already. Be safe.

    • Hi Eric

      First, thank you for the compliments on the blog.

      We weren’t at all aware of the weather in Lake Ontario. Last night we had nothing but a warm gentle breeze. I hope all our friends back home faired OK in those big winds!

  4. Take care of yourselves and stay safe. You’re going to have ringside seats for Earl, it appears! Meanwhile, it’s amazing how much difference 8 feet can make! ZTC looks like a kittenmaran next to that 440! Have fun while you are there. Nice thing about no schedule is, no deadlines! Weather looks bad, enjoy hanging out where you are! And do some uke playing below if it gets too wet and nasty for on-deck performing! BTW, Mike, it looks as though Rebecca is better at that pole thing than you are! She has better form and gets better distance, both height and distance off!

  5. Love the contrast! About where Earl is taking his turn North sits our boat in the hurricane hole. Looks like you should be fine! I love that you guys are happy and content. Rest of us wishing and hoping for those days on the water.

  6. We really enjoyed the attached blog and Kirk’s answer to “Why Cruising”, as well as the comments. Nice pics too!

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